Easy Access List——Questions Artifact Collectors Pose to Professional Archaeologists

Math

How Archaeology Is Like a Math Test

We get numerous visitors and views at the Archaeology in Tennessee blog each day of the year.  However, I have noticed that very few visitors ever read our 13 blog articles (thus far—and more to come) in our ongoing series of articles entitled Questions Artifact Collectors Pose to Professional Archaeologists. Over my past six decades, most artifact collectors and other citizens I have ever known hope for an opportunity to pose a few questions to professional archaeologists, and they hope even more to obtain a longer and better answer than what they often get. I had hoped this series of blog articles would answer some of the common questions artifact collectors and ordinary citizens on the street often ask. Perhaps you found it hard to navigate from one question to another on this blog.  If that was so, I kindly apologize and have a solution to the problem.

It occurred to me that I could make such navigation much easier for you by creating a list of the questions, stating the main subject matter of each question, and leaving you the proper hyperlinks to click on——and go immediately to whichever questions interest you. I have done that for you in the list below. Have fun—and if you think of any new questions you would like to ask, you may click on the Leave a Reply button to the left under the title of each blog article and leave a comment containing your question. You may also send a question to me by e-mail.  Just click on the Contact Button at the tops of our blog pages. Here is the list of questions and the safe hyperlinks to click:

 

Question No. 1

Archaeologists, How They Work, and Their Rectangular Artifact Curation Boxes

 

 

Question No. 2

Misunderstandings and Weird Interactions Between Professional Archaeologists and Artifact Collectors

 

 

Question No. 3

Why Archaeologists Write So Much!!!

 

 

Question No. 4

An Endless Supply of Artifacts for Artifact Collectors

 

 

Question No. 5

The Importance or Unimportance of Artifact Rescue

 

 

Question No. 6

Artifact Collector Suggestion on How to Seek Vengeance Against Professional Archaeologists

 

 

Question No. 7

How the Word “Looting” Is Actually Defined in American Archaeology

 

 

Question No. 8

A Legendary Archaeology Book

 

 

Question No. 9

Archaeology, Artifact Collecting, and Playing Social Roles

 

 

Question No. 10

Famous Archaeologists’ Con Game to Steal Artifacts from Artifact Collectors and Citizens

 

 

Question No. 11

A Few Thoughts on On-Line Artifact Collector and Treasure Hunting Forums

 

 

Question No. 12

Why Your Artifact Collector Buddy Was Arrested

 

 

Question No. 13

Some Basics on Understanding Federal/State Laws and Regulations Affecting Artifact Collecting

 

 

Question No. 14

“We Artifact Collectors are Better Quality Human Beings Than You Archaeologists: You Archaeologists Hide Most of Your Great Artifacts from the Public—but We Artifact Collectors Put our Artifacts on Display for the Public to File Through and View. Nya-Nya-Nya-Nya…..Nya.”

Next Question to be Addressed—TBA

 

2 thoughts on “Easy Access List——Questions Artifact Collectors Pose to Professional Archaeologists

  1. dover1952 Post author

    Hi Joshua. Thanks for commenting. I assume you are wondering about the little note that heads this blog article. The generic post-it note that heads this article is an actual, on-line complaint by a math student about how hard some high school and college math tests can be. Some math teachers make tests much harder than they need to be by introducing into test questions bizarre mathematical quirks or extra mathematical information that was not covered in class. I had a high school math teacher who did that, but it was usually in extra credit questions at the bottom of the test.

    Solving some anthropological and archaeological mysteries can be just as quirky and complicated as bizarre questions on a math test, especially when poorly collected and spotty ethnographic information is thrown into the mix of solving the mystery. Ethnologically speaking, in my personal opinion, someone trading human souls for cupcakes is not totally out of the question among primitive peoples somewhere on this Earth today. When I first saw that generic post-it note, I laughed—and laughed—-and laughed because (both in the realm of mathematics and in the realms of archaeology and ethnology) the overall mix is not totally out of the question and is doggone funny. Overall Bottom Line: The note is a joke that I thought readers would enjoy, and I hoped it would cause some soul-healing laughter for my readers—readers like you. Have a happy day. If you have any other questions, please let me know.

    Reply

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